Category: Technology

What a difference a century makes

Here are some statistics for the Year 1919: The average life expectancy for men was 47 years. Fuel for cars was sold in drug stores only. Only 14 percent of the homes had a bathtub. Only 8 percent of the homes had a telephone. The maximum speed limit in most cities was 10 mph. The …

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James Bond 007 Spy Car

Displayed near the front door of the International Spy museum in Washington D.C. is a James Bond 007 car. This sweet little sports car shows off the technology to help Bond evade some bad guys.

Kadena Technical Control Facility Intermediate Distribution Frame

I belong to a group of people who share stories, photos, and stuff about different places they work.  Here is a photo of the Kadena Airbase Tech Control Facility’s intermediate distribution frame that another person shared.  He said this photo was from the 70’s or 80’s.  What’s funny is when I was there in the …

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German Enigma Machine

This is a four rotor Enigma machine that was created by German around the time of 1943-1944.  Germany built this rare Enigma for its ally, Japan.  You can tell by both the character and the fourth rotor.  Germany was unaware that Britain had cracked the Enigma they added the fourth rotor in 1942 to strengthen …

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The Spirit of St. Louis

Hanging high in the Smithsonian National Air and Space museum is the Spirit of St. Louis.  This plane is best known for being flown by Charles Lindbergh on the first solo non-stop transatlantic flight from New York to London on May 20-21st, 1927.

Lunar Module 2

Between 1969 and 1972, six lunar modules essentially identical to this one landed a total of 12 American astronauts on the Moon.  This lunar module, LM-2, never flew into space.  It was built for testing in low Earth orbit, but was actually used on Earth to measure the LM’s ability to withstand the forces of …

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Magellan Global Positioning System Test Components

The Magellan Systems Corporation produced some of the earliest handheld GPS units for civilian use.  In 1986 its engineers began experimenting with electronic mockups of a unit.  Displayed here is the earliest “breadboard” and keyboard used to test circuitry and components at Magellan.

First Operational Intelligence Satellite, the GRAB I

The GRAB I was the first operational intelligence satellite that would detect pulses from Soviet radars and then relay them to ground stations where they would be sent for analysis.

International Spy Museum Mechanical Dragonfly

At the International Spy Museum located in Washington D.C. there are many interesting things that can be found.  Here is a graphic depicting a mechanical dragonfly that could be used to listen to conversations or take photos without being detected.

Siemens-Halske W38 Phone

This switchboard operator’s desk telephone was manufactured by Siemens-Halske in Germany.  It is believe the history of this specific device was removed from one of the U.S. Missions in Germany.  A close inspection of the typed labels for the switches are in German. The telephone was called “REIPOS”.  The bulk of the unit is made …

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German Spy Pigeon

During World War I (1914-1918) Germany had equipped pigeons with small camera equipment for the benefit of gaining intelligence.

International Spy Museum Micro Camera

At the International Spy Museum located in Washington D.C. there are many interesting things that can be found.  Here is a graphic depicting a micro camera.

The Viking Lander at the Smithsonian

The Smithsonian Museum of Air and Space located in Washington D.C. is the host to many free exhibits that are the culmination of different major events throughout history for both flight and space travel.  The Viking Lander shown here is one of those exhibits.  The Viking Lander is best known for being the first U.S. …

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International Spy Museum Army Cipher Device

At the International Spy Museum located in Washington D.C. there are many interesting things that can be found.  Here is a graphic depicting an Army cipher device.

Cesium Frequency Standard Atomic Clock

Rubidium Frequency Standard Atomic Clock

The Wright Brothers at the Smithsonian

At the Smithsonian museum of air and space is an exhibit featuring the Orville and Wilbur Wright.  The Wright brothers exhibit features the aircraft in which they first flew at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina and the vertical four-cylinder engine that powered their aircraft.

International Spy Museum Hidden Shoe Compartment

At the International Spy Museum located in Washington D.C. there are many interesting things that can be found.  Here is a graphic depicting a hidden compartment in the heal of a shoe.

Back to Using Hieroglyphics

Joy of Pay Phone Coin Return

Male Version of Alexa

Grandma Telephone

Northern Lights From Space

Eugene Shoemaker’s Sketch of Meteor Crater

Davis Monthan Air Force Base Boneyard

Davis Monthan Air Force Base is located southeast of downtown Tuscon, Arizona. Here lies an aircraft boneyard where numerous planes can be found resting and waiting to be picked apart for parts.

Oldest Apple Computer

Texting For Seniors

Old Technology

Useful Inventions

1. Wash your hands and then use the water for your next flush. 2. Traffic lights in Ukraine. 3. This water fountain allows the water to flow down so dogs can drink too. 4. A mountain finder device in Switzerland. 5. An accessibility mat on the beach for strollers and wheelchairs. 6. This pill bottle …

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Backstage Look at the Oscars

We were able to get a first hand backstage look at everything that goes into hosting the Academy Awards. It is quite remarkable to see all the people setting up the decorations, walls, lighting, sound, cameras, carpeting, and making sure that everything is in place and ready for the event to go off without a …

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National Space Development Agency of Japan Communications and Broadcasting Engineering Test Satellite

Click here to download the full NASDA Communications and Broadcasting Engineering Test Satellite text This is a pamphlet I picked up at the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) museum when I was in Okinawa, Japan. This pamphlet is about the Communications and Broadcasting Engineering Test Satellite (COMET) satellite.